Training Scheme

Training Scheme

Scouting is not only about young people, but also about the development of adults within the Movement. The Scout Association Adult Training Scheme is modular and flexible, concentrating on doing what you’re learning rather than just attending courses. The scheme takes into account what you already know and can demonstrate to create individual learning plans.

Key points of the scheme:

  • You only do what is needed for your role
  • Its tailored to you, what you know, how you learn, how you scout
  • Its modular so you can fit it around your commitments
  • You get the personal support of a training adviser
  • Its about doing, you demonstrate skills and knowledge in practice – we call it validation
  • Leaders and Managers achieve their Wood Badge on completion of their training and can wear the wood beads
  • The Scout Association publishes a range of material that describes the scheme

How it works:

Soon after your meeting with the appointments committee, you will be advised on how to complete the Getting Started training. This is mandatory for all appointments and primarily covers what Scouting is about, how we keep our young people and ourselves safe and how we protect our young people. Different roles complete different variations and you will be informed which ones your role requires.

Around the same time, you will be allocated a Training Adviser. They are part of the county training team and may be your line manager or someone with experience of scouting or someone who’s just finished their training and knows the ropes. Locally, people are matched up, usually by the Local Training Manager. We call our Training Advisers, TAs. The TA will arrange to meet you to discuss what you already know, how you learn and how best to support you. The aim is to produce a Personal Learning Plan with you.

Certain roles require the person to hold a first aid certificate. If you need to do this, you should attend the course within your first year.

For each module which you do at your own pace, you need to do LEARNING and VALIDATION.

Learning is learning the skills and knowledge needed. You may already have this from your job or a previous role in scouting. Or you may learn it on the job, or do specific training. Training can be done as self-study using an online course or a workbook (not all modules have this option) or you can attend an instructor-led course. This is a great opportunity to meet other new leaders and chat about the learning and your experience in scouting.

Validation is about putting the learning into practice, to demonstrate you are on your way to being a great leader. You will agree tasks with your TA and often you will pick tasks that were already planned by your team. You may discuss this once you’ve done the learning or when you agree your Personal Learning Plan (PLP).

If you are working towards the Wood Badge (mandatory for some roles), it is recommended that you complete your training within 3 years. You will meet regularly with your TA to review progress and sign items off. When the PLP is complete, you are recommended to be awarded your Wood beads, the sign of a fully trained leader.

Put your phone down and what are you left with? Just teamwork, courage and the skills to succeed.’
Bear Grylls, Chief Scout Bear Grylls